Arabian Love Poems Nizar Qabbani Pdf Free

Ahlan أهــْــلاً , Arabic lovers! Today, I am presenting a beautiful love poem by the great Arab poet Nizar Qabbani نــِــزَارقــَــبــَّــانــِــي . The poem is entitled; “Hamlet; The Poet هــامــلــت شــاعــراً“. In the poem, the lover rushes in his love like Hamlet. He borrows some lines from Hamlet and adapts them to the theme of love. He seeks unlimited love in return to his endless love. He loves madly and asks his beloved to get mad, too. I made the English translation for the poem and I hope you will love it.

The Lovers at Gretna Green by Lapsus Kalamari via Flicker

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أنْ تـكـوني اِمـرأةً . أو لا تـكـونـي .

To be a woman . or not to be

تـلـكَ . تـلـكَ الـمـسـألــَـهْ

This . this is the question

أنْ تـكـوني اِمـرأتـي الـمـفـضــَّــلـهْ

To be my favorite woman

قـطــَّــتـي الـتـركــيــَّــة الـمـُــدلــَّــلــهْ .

My Turkish pet cat

أنْ تـكـونـي الـشـمـسَ . يـا شـمـسَ عــُــيــونـي

To be the sun . O, you; sun of my eyes

و يــداً طــيــّــبــةً فــوقَ جــبــيــنــي

To be a kind hand over my forehead

أنْ تـكــونـي فـي حــيــاتــي الــمــقــْــبــِــلــَــهْ

To be in my future life

نــجــمــةً . تــلــكَ الــمــشــكــِــلــَــهْ

A star . this is the question!

أنْ تــكــونــي كــلَّ شــيّْ .

To be everything .

أو تــُــضــيــعــي كــلَّ شــيّْ .

Or to lose everything .

إنَّ طــبــْــعــي عــنــدمــا أهــوى

My mood when in love

كــطــبــْــعِ الــبــَــرْبــَــريّْ .

Is like that of a barbarian

أنْ تــكــونــي .

To be .

كــلَّ مــا يــحــمــلــُــهُ نــوَّارُ مــن عــُــشــْــبٍ نــديّْ

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أنْ تــكــونــي . دفــتــري الأزرقَ .

To be . my blue notebook

أوراقــي . مــِـدادي الــذهــنــيّْ .

My papers . my mental ink

أنْ تــكــونــي . كــَــلــِــمــَــةً

To be . a word

تــبــحــثُ عــن عــُــنــوانــِــهــا فــي شــَــفــَــتــيّْ

That seeks its address on my lips

طــفــلــةً تــكــبــرُ مــا بــيــن يــديّْ

A child that grows up in my hands

آهِ يــا حــوريــةً أرســَــلــهــَــا الــبــحــرُ إلــيّْ .

O, you fairy that the sea has sent to me .

و يــا قــَــرْعَ الــطــُــبــُــولِ الــهــَــمــَــجــيّْ

O, you barbarian beat of drums

إفْــهــَــمــيــنــي .

Understand me .

أتــمــنــَّــى مــُــخــْــلــصــاً أنْ تــَــفــْــهــَــمــيــنــي

I sincerely hope that you understand me

رُبــَّــمــا . أخــطــأتُ فــي شــرحِ ظــنــُــونــي

Maybe . I have misexplained my thoughts

رُبــَّــمــا ســِــرتُ إلــى حــُــبــِّــكِ مــعــصــوبَ الــعــيــونِ

Maybe I have walked to your love blindly

و نــَــســَــفــْــتُ الــجــســرَ مــا بــيــنَ اِتــِّــزانــي و جــُــنــونــي

And blew up the bridge between my balance and madness

أنــا لا يــمــكــنُ أنْ أعــشــقَ إلاّ بــجــُــنــونــي

I can never love but with madness

فــاِقــْــبــَــلــِــيــنــي هــكــذا . أو فــارْفـــُــضــِــيــنــي.

So, accept me like this . or reject me

إنــْــصــتــي لــي .

Listen to me .

أتــمــنــَّــى مــُــخــْــلــصــاً أنْ تــُــنــْــصــِــتــي لــي .

I do sincerely hope that you listen

مــا هــُــنــاكَ اِمــرأةٌ دُونَ بــديــلِ

There is no woman with no alternate

فــاتــنٌ وجــهــُــكِ . لــكــنْ فــي الــهــوى

Charming is your face . but in love

لــيــس تــكــفــي فــتــنــةُ الــوجــه الــجــمــيــلِ

It is not enough to have a charming face

إفْــعــَــلــي مــا شــِــئــتِ . لــكــنْ حــاذِري .

Do whatever you want . but beware

حــاذِري أنْ تــقــتــلــي فــيَّ فــُــضــُـــولــي .

Beware of killing curiosity in me

تــَــعــِــبــَــتْ كــفــَّـــايَ . يــا ســيــِّـــدتــي

My hands got tired . O, Mistress

و أنــا أطـــرُقُ بــابَ الــمــُــســْــتــَــحــيــلِ .

While I was knocking the door of the impossible

فــاِعــشــقــي كــالــنــَّــاس . أو لا تــعــشــقــي

So, love like people . or do not love

إنــَّــنــِـي أرفــُــضُ أَنــْــصــَــافَ الــحــُــلــُــولِ .

I do refuse half-solutions.

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* More poems of Nizar Babbani on our Arabic Blog:

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Peace ســَــلام /Salam/

Collaboratively translated into English by Bassam K. Frangieh and Clementina R. Brown, Arabian Love Poems showcases the poetry and verse of Syrian born Nizar Kabbani (1923-1998). Kabbani's poetry is direct, spontaneous, musical, and drew upon the language of everyday life. Each poem is presented in a bilingual text of Arabic and English in this superbly presented edition which will well serve to introduce an American readership to one of the finest 20th Century poets of the Middle East. When I wrote your name/On the notebook of roses/I knew/All the illiterate,/All the sick and impotent men/Would stand against me./When I decided to kill the last Caliph,/To announce/The establishment of a state of love/Crowning you as its queen,/I knew/Only the birds/Would sing of the revolution with me. Qabbani was revered by generations of Arabs for his sensual andromantic verse.

His work was featured not only in his two dozenvolumes of poetry and in regular contributions to the Arabic-language newspaper Al Hayat, but in lyrics sung by Lebanese and Syrian vocalists who helped popularize his work. The Syrian poet Youssef Karkoutly said in Damascus today that Qabbani had been 'as necessary to our lives as air.' Through a lifetime of writing, Qabbani made women his main theme and inspiration. He earned a reputation for daring with the publication in 1954 of his first volume of verse, 'Childhood of a Breast,' which broke with the conservative traditions of Arabic literature. But it was not until he resigned from the Syrian diplomatic service in 1966 that Qabbani reached full flower. After the Arab defeat in the 1967 Arab-Israeli war, he founded the Nizar Qabbani publishing house in London, and his became a powerful and eloquent voice of lament for Arab causes.

Qabbani was a committed Arab nationalist and in recent years his poetry and other writings, including essays and journalism, had become more political. But his writing also often fused themes of romantic and political despair, and it sometimes treated the oppression of women as a metaphor for what he saw as the Arabs' cursed fate.

In his poem 'Drawing with Words' he wrote: When a man wishes a woman he blows a horn, But when a woman wishes a man she eats the cotton of her pillow. The Egyptian novelist Mona Helmi said of Qabbani today, 'His greatness came from his ability to put into beautiful words not only the ordinary actions between men and women, but also between the ruler and ruled and the oppressor and the oppressed.' Gamal el-Ghitanti, the Egyptian novelist and editor of the weekly News of Literature, praised Qabbani as having been 'by any measure a great Arab poet who made a big effort to make his poetry understandable to all people and not only to the elite.' Qabbani published his first poem, 'The Brunette had Told Me,' in 1944, a year before he graduated with a law degree from the University of Damascus. He held diplomatic posts in Cairo, Ankara, London, Madrid, Beijing and Beirut before resigning, and had lived in London since 1967. But the Syrian capital remained a powerful presence in his poems, most notably in 'The Jasmine Scent of Damascus.' In his later years, Qabbani's poems included a strong strain of anti-authoritarianism.

One couplet in particular - 'O Sultan, my master, if my clothes are ripped and torn it is because your dogs with claws are allowed to tear me' - is sometimes quoted by Arabs as a kind of wry shorthand for their frustration with life under dictatorship. Still, Qabbani never explicitly criticized his native country or its long-reigning leader, President Hafez al-Assad, and that allowed him to be hailed across Syria as a national hero. Assad, who recently named a main street in Damascus after the poet, was reported today to be planning to dispatch a. Qabbani was revered by generations of Arabs for his sensual andromantic verse. His work was featured not only in his two dozenvolumes of poetry and in regular contributions to the Arabic-language newspaper Al Hayat, but in lyrics sung by Lebanese and Syrian vocalists who helped popularize his work. The Syrian poet Youssef Karkoutly said in Damascus today that Qabbani had been 'as necessary to our lives as air.' Through a lifetime of writing, Qabbani made women his main theme and inspiration.

He earned a reputation for daring with the publication in 1954 of his first volume of verse, 'Childhood of a Breast,' which broke with the conservative traditions of Arabic literature. But it was not until he resigned from the Syrian diplomatic service in 1966 that Qabbani reached full flower. After the Arab defeat in the 1967 Arab-Israeli war, he founded the Nizar Qabbani publishing house in London, and his became a powerful and eloquent voice of lament for Arab causes. Qabbani was a committed Arab nationalist and in recent years his poetry and other writings, including essays and journalism, had become more political. But his writing also often fused themes of romantic and political despair, and it sometimes treated the oppression of women as a metaphor for what he saw as the Arabs' cursed fate.

In his poem 'Drawing with Words' he wrote: When a man wishes a woman he blows a horn, But when a woman wishes a man she eats the cotton of her pillow. The Egyptian novelist Mona Helmi said of Qabbani today, 'His greatness came from his ability to put into beautiful words not only the ordinary actions between men and women, but also between the ruler and ruled and the oppressor and the oppressed.'

Gamal el-Ghitanti, the Egyptian novelist and editor of the weekly News of Literature, praised Qabbani as having been 'by any measure a great Arab poet who made a big effort to make his poetry understandable to all people and not only to the elite.' Qabbani published his first poem, 'The Brunette had Told Me,' in 1944, a year before he graduated with a law degree from the University of Damascus. He held diplomatic posts in Cairo, Ankara, London, Madrid, Beijing and Beirut before resigning, and had lived in London since 1967. But the Syrian capital remained a powerful presence in his poems, most notably in 'The Jasmine Scent of Damascus.' In his later years, Qabbani's poems included a strong strain of anti-authoritarianism. One couplet in particular - 'O Sultan, my master, if my clothes are ripped and torn it is because your dogs with claws are allowed to tear me' - is sometimes quoted by Arabs as a kind of wry shorthand for their frustration with life under dictatorship. Still, Qabbani never explicitly criticized his native country or its long-reigning leader, President Hafez al-Assad, and that allowed him to be hailed across Syria as a national hero.