M48 Yugo Mauser Serial Numbers

Yugo ( Serbian ) M48 or M48A, 8MM Mauser Rifle, Bent Bolt With Beautiful Yugo Receiver Crest. Standard Grade will show bluing wear and typical dents and dings. Hand Select will be pretty darn nice.

The value really depends on the condition, not the year it was manufactured. Earlier ones will have milled floor plates. Later ones will have stamped floor plates. I've never noticed this to have a large impact on value either but I imagine the milled type would be preferred by most. $300 seems to be a good average these days.

Numbers

You won't find many in decent condition for less than that. $400 is about the max for one that looks unissued unless it's a Mitchells collector grade, they price them around $500 but its still only worth what it's worth based on condition so I would never recommend paying Mitchells premium. You can find beat up ones for $200-$250 and really bad ones for $150 but there really aren't many really bad ones.

The letters before the serial numbers are a prefix. It is part of the serial number. They would start with 00001 and then work up to 99999. If they needed more numbers, the prefix comes in, A00001-A99999, then B00001-B99999 and so on. Some would start with the A prefix, just depends on the country. Some countries also assign the prefix blocks to certain times or manufacturers so it may not mean that many rifles were produced prior. It isn't real helpful generally to tell when the rifle was made.

In regards to M48s, it is not a prefix. But a batch number. They are only present on the first 100,000 M48 rifles, then was dropped and just the numbers were given per model from that point on. The 'K' indicates that rifle was in that number batch.

From the alphabet in Bogdanovic's book, would seem to be the 13th batch (judging the example he made in the book). With M48s, they did somewhere around 52,000 to 53,000 rifles in the first year of production (1950).

Your serial number works out to 1951 production, which was about 92,000 rifles. There are some discrepancies in the production numbers, which is mentioned in Bogdanovic's book. My M48A does not have a prefix. And is the 51239 M48A rifle produced. Works out to 1953 production. In regards to M48s, it is not a prefix.

But a batch number. They are only present on the first 100,000 M48 rifles, then was dropped and just the numbers were given per model from that point on. The 'K' indicates that rifle was in that number batch.

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From the alphabet in Bogdanovic's book, would seem to be the 13th batch (judging the example he made in the book). With M48s, they did somewhere around 52,000 to 53,000 rifles in the first year of production (1950). Your serial number works out to 1951 production, which was about 92,000 rifles. There are some discrepancies in the production numbers, which is mentioned in Bogdanovic's book. My M48A does not have a prefix. And is the 51239 M48A rifle produced.

Works out to 1953 production. Thanks so much guys for all the help.

The value really depends on the condition, not the year it was manufactured. Earlier ones will have milled floor plates.

Later ones will have stamped floor plates. I've never noticed this to have a large impact on value either but I imagine the milled type would be preferred by most. $300 seems to be a good average these days.

You won't find many in decent condition for less than that. $400 is about the max for one that looks unissued unless it's a Mitchells collector grade, they price them around $500 but its still only worth what it's worth based on condition so I would never recommend paying Mitchells premium. You can find beat up ones for $200-$250 and really bad ones for $150 but there really aren't many really bad ones. You'd be surprised. Here in Texas at a gun show a few weeks back some old guy was trying to pass one off as a 'Yugoslavian WWII ' and asking $900 for it. He also had a couple of nice Lee-Enfield's that were decently priced, but at figures if he was trying to gouge people on a M48 and lying about what it was, I wasn't going to take a chance on anything else he had.