The Big Bang Simon Singh Pdf Download

By Simon Singh

ISBN-10: 0007375506

ISBN-13: 9780007375509

The bestselling writer of Fermat's final Theorem and The Code publication tells the tale of the intense minds that deciphered the mysteries of the massive Bang. a desirable exploration of the last word query: how was once our universe created?

Albert Einstein as soon as stated: 'The so much incomprehensible factor in regards to the universe is that it really is comprehensible.' Simon Singh believes geniuses like Einstein aren't the single humans capable of grab the physics that govern the universe. all of us can.

As good as explaining what the large Bang idea truly is and why cosmologists think it's a correct description of the origins of the universe, this publication is additionally the attention-grabbing tale of the scientists who fought opposed to the proven proposal of an everlasting and unchanging universe. Simon Singh, popular for making tricky principles less daunting than they first look, is definitely the right consultant for this journey.

Everybody has heard of the massive Bang conception. yet what number people can really declare to appreciate it? With attribute readability and a story peppered with anecdotes and private histories of these who've struggled to appreciate construction, Simon Singh has written the tale of crucial idea ever.

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B ) When I + is spacelike an event horizon occurs. Quantum entanglement can also be characterized using Fig. 1. When there exists global coherence in Hilbert space, nonlocal interactions necessarily couple a $(x) inside its lightcone at Si with other $(x)’s outside its lightcone at So by means of a quantum interaction potential. The neglect of this coherence might be described as the quantum entanglement problem. 3. Examples: Nonlocality in Nuclear Physics and Quantum Mechanics What are some specific examples of nonlocality and quantum entanglement in physics?

13) 18 80 -5 80 60 s 60 v 2 I- 4 40 40 20 0 400 L 800 0 400 800 L Figure 7. 75. Figure courtesy S. McGaugh. This result passes several basic consistency tests. First, the sum of RM, a, matches that seen in the CMB experiments, Eq. (11). Olhr2). 009, in good agreement with the distribution of galaxy structure seen in our own cosmic n e i g h b ~ r h o o d These phenomena involve independent physics on widely different scales, and we would regard it as remarkable for a simple procedure like the one described above to agree with all three by chance alone.

In this sense our survey is unbiased toward detections a t shorter wavelengths. However, most sources show one-sided jets, suggesting that beaming is substantial. The sample was extracted from the list of known radio jets of Bridle & Perley (1984) and Liu & Xie (1992). The selection criteria were chosen in order t o match the Chandra and HST capabilities. 8 and a, (1' or better) published radio maps show that a t least one bright ( 2 5 mJy) radio knot is present at > 3' from the nucleus, to prevent contamination from the wings of the core PSF.

A half century ago, a shocking Washington Post headline claimed that the world began in five cataclysmic minutes rather than having existed for all time; a skeptical scientist dubbed the maverick theory the Big Bang. In this amazingly comprehensible history of the universe, Simon Singh decodes the mystery behind the Big Bang theory, lading us through the development of one A half century ago, a shocking Washington Post headline claimed that the world began in five cataclysmic minutes rather than having existed for all time; a skeptical scientist dubbed the maverick theory the Big Bang. In this amazingly comprehensible history of the universe, Simon Singh decodes the mystery behind the Big Bang theory, lading us through the development of one of the most extraordinary, important, and awe-inspiring theories in science.

‘ Curiosity’ is a curious thing! It’s the only quality that differentiates humans from all the other living organisms (well, at least on the surface of Earth!). Solely driven by this ‘exclusive feature’, Man has discovered the intricate design of nature and invented his way to mimic it. If one speculates enough, he will find that all our technologies are simply based on the happenings going on around us in the nature. If you are a romantic one and like to see the nature’s creation as a Grand Oper ‘ Curiosity’ is a curious thing! It’s the only quality that differentiates humans from all the other living organisms (well, at least on the surface of Earth!).

Solely driven by this ‘exclusive feature’, Man has discovered the intricate design of nature and invented his way to mimic it. If one speculates enough, he will find that all our technologies are simply based on the happenings going on around us in the nature. If you are a romantic one and like to see the nature’s creation as a Grand Opera, then perhaps, it won’t be too wrong to say that our technologies represent our rendition of this opera. The key to this derivation process is just raising a simple question, “ How did this happen?” and raising questions is science.

Science is a direct descendent of philosophy. While philosophy asks “ Why?”, science asks “ How?”. There are too many ' How?' The idea is if we can gather enough answers to these questions, they will eventually lead us to the “ Why”. Finding an answer to one “How?” reveals that there are lots of other “Hows” lurking in the darkness. It’s like solving a ginormous cryptic puzzle.

The clues are right before our eyes but they are way too scattered. You pick one wrong clue, you are horribly led astray and this is a very frequent case. Throughout the course of civilization, humans often forgot to raise questions, picked up the wrong clues and acted upon doctrinal views.

These were (and still are) the obstacles in the way of finding the answers of “How”. The point today science is standing at, is achieved by walking through such an uneven path and the history is often bloody as well. Starting from the Greek philosophers’ era to the modern times, people have been wondering about the origin of everything and the idea of a 'Big Bang' seems to give us the answers, finally. Today Big Bang has become a very common concept and almost everyone you find on the streets can spend a few words on it. Like many other science theories, Big Bang also had to fight a tough battle to survive.

It might sound a little exaggerated, but Big Bang theory is said to be human kind’s greatest achievement (accumulating all the philosophical and scientific disciplines). So, one naturally can ask now how this great idea, that explains the creation’s origin, was conceived? British science writer Simon Singh produces a weighty tome on the history of Big Bang that tells the enthralling tales of the origin of the universe. There is science and there is history, a lot of history. Singh proves himself to be a great story teller who makes the highly complicated ideas very much accessible, literally to anyone.

This book proves again that one doesn't have to be a science major to learn the science. You will have a good idea how scientists are calculating the enormous distances from our planet to the stars just by reading few paragraphs. No mathematical manipulation, no tedious calculation, nothing!

You will be badly hooked on this book once you start it, I can almost bet on it! The way the book is organized also allows you to keep things in mind without much stress. The tales of the mavericks, the mad scientists, based on whose contributions the Big Bang model is established, are very inspiring and fascinating. Famous astronomer Carl Sagan’s “Cosmos” inspired many to become real life astronomers. I think it won’t be surprising if Singh’s “Big Bang: The Origin of The Universe” plays a similar role.

For aspiring astronomers, physicists, even science writers, this book will be a great head start. The Universe is quite old. The Big Bang model gives us an average age of 13.8 billion years, as of today.

Once people asked how we were created and many centuries later we found that Big Bang is probably the answer. Now another question has already been raised. “ What happened before Big Bang?” Well, this certainly will give birth to a very hot philosophical (and religious too) debate and I do not possess enough knowledge and audacity (probably the scientists do not either!) to continue this discussion.

Instead, I will simply quote St. Augustine (b. 354 AD) as Singh himself did in the epilogue of the book. I am putting it here for the sheer fun of it and nothing serious! “ What was God doing before He created the Universe?

Before He created Heaven and Earth, God created hell to be used for people such as you who ask this kind of question”! Full of fascinating historical anecdotes and character sketches, 'Big Bang' was fun as well as informative from start to finish.

I struggle with physics books because my mind often has trouble grasping concepts at different scales from our own, but Singh writes and explains so well that I was not just able to understand but was able to teach it to my kids afterward! I now look at the skies differently as a result of reading this book, and my knowledge of the history of physics is a lot richer.

S Full of fascinating historical anecdotes and character sketches, 'Big Bang' was fun as well as informative from start to finish. I struggle with physics books because my mind often has trouble grasping concepts at different scales from our own, but Singh writes and explains so well that I was not just able to understand but was able to teach it to my kids afterward! I now look at the skies differently as a result of reading this book, and my knowledge of the history of physics is a lot richer. Strongly recommended for anyone who likes science fact and history books. My wondering thrust me to a world of infinity.

Confusion reached its nadir and I gasped to know it all. Remembering 'Don't Panic', I started to organize my thoughts.

I gathered the first step towards solving any of my bewilderment would be to understand the theories of how it all began - the universe, the time, the life. I turned to Stephan Hawking's widely unread bestseller 'A Brief History of Time'. Though it answered some of my questions, in turn posed many more than before. I realized that t My wondering thrust me to a world of infinity. Confusion reached its nadir and I gasped to know it all. Remembering 'Don't Panic', I started to organize my thoughts.

I gathered the first step towards solving any of my bewilderment would be to understand the theories of how it all began - the universe, the time, the life. I turned to Stephan Hawking's widely unread bestseller 'A Brief History of Time'. Though it answered some of my questions, in turn posed many more than before. I realized that to move further I have to take a peep into Mr Einstein's mind. Since my small mind is too simple to comprehend any complexities, I rather chose 'Relativity Simply Explained' by Martin Gardner. With vivid illustrations, the author tried to make me appreciate both the special and general theories of relativity, the concepts of space-time, the twin paradox, et al. But again, I was not thoroughly convinced about my understanding.

I oscillated between 'Oh! Now, I got it' and 'You lost me again.' Desperate to get rid of the pricking confusions, I searched for a good source. In my favourite old book store, I found this book lying in one corner with 'Big Bang' written over its cover and below it an Indian name 'Simon Singh'. Reluctantly I put it in my book-cart. And as I read through I became more and more convinced that this is by far the best book on this topic I had come across. The ease with which Singh has explained the concept of 'Time is personal' made me a big fan of the book.

It not only clarified many of my doubts, but also fed me lots of food for thoughts. In the course of explaining the theories of universe, the book with a very illustrious way takes the reader through the history of the evolution of these ideas. With humourous anecdotes related to famous scientists it amuses the reader while explaining the most complicated fundamentals. What I find the best about this book is - it doesn't try to be too technical with physics mumbo jumbo, rather it tries to explain each concept in a layman's way without discussing a single mathematical equation. Probably the author realized the essence of this Einstein saying - 'If you can't explain something to a six-year-old, you really don't understand it yourself.' The book mightn't have answered all my questions, but it did take me through Copernicus to Hoyle in a lyrical manner. Reading it, the model of big bang has come alive in my mind.

It definitely opened a window to cosmos. Today's sky looks so different and intriguing than yesterday's. This translates to a short history of the cosmos.

A complex theory like that of big bang builds on a lot of knowledge, so the author begins with the ancient greeks and move forward from there. The book is written with humour, insight into human nature and endless fascination about the universe. There is enthusiasm in every sentence. However, the book ends with the final proof that there really was an explosive start to the universe, which somehow feels a bit anti-climatic. 'Wasn't there more?' O This translates to a short history of the cosmos.

A complex theory like that of big bang builds on a lot of knowledge, so the author begins with the ancient greeks and move forward from there. The book is written with humour, insight into human nature and endless fascination about the universe. There is enthusiasm in every sentence. However, the book ends with the final proof that there really was an explosive start to the universe, which somehow feels a bit anti-climatic. 'Wasn't there more?' Of course there's more, just not in this book. Nonetheless, a terrific read for any lay reader with a sound curiousity about the world we live in and where it came from.

Simon Singh is one of my favorite authors. He quickly rose to this rank after I read The Code Book, loved it way more than I ever expected, and afterward devoured every other book of his I could find. He has the unique ability to write nonfiction in a way that is as readable and intriguing as fiction, while simultaneously providing the complete context of the topic he has set out to explore. What I think is so commendable about Simon Singh is that he starts wayyyyy at the beginning of the story i Simon Singh is one of my favorite authors. He quickly rose to this rank after I read The Code Book, loved it way more than I ever expected, and afterward devoured every other book of his I could find. He has the unique ability to write nonfiction in a way that is as readable and intriguing as fiction, while simultaneously providing the complete context of the topic he has set out to explore.

What I think is so commendable about Simon Singh is that he starts wayyyyy at the beginning of the story in history- generations before the thought may ever occur to anyone- so that he can tell the entirety of the meaning of the topic. To me, that is the perfect way to learn about a subject. And the fact that he can do so on a nonfiction topic- spanning hundreds of years in his telling, dipping in and out of cosmology, mythology and physics- and still keep it readable goes to show how adept he is at these types of books. I'm not normally a nonfiction reader because I seem to have a short attention span for anything that comes off as too dry to me, but I was actually crushingly disappointed when I later realized I had read through all of his books available. Big Bang itself taught me a lot about a topic I thought I knew fairly well after all the times it had been mentioned in school. It turned out there was a lot that I was missing and I found it fascinating to read a more complete history.

I actually brought Big Bang home with me one Christmas for 'light reading.' A 500+ page book on The Big Bang Theory and the origin of the universe truly did feel like light reading to me. Of course, it ended up sparking some interesting conversation with a family member who doesn't happen to believe that the Big Bang occurred. Finally, I also have to say that my favorite, nerdiest insult I have ever heard came from this book: 'One of the fiercest critics of the Big Bang model was the Bulgarian-born Fritz Zwicky, infamous among cosmologists for his eccentricity and recalcitrance.

He had been invited to Caltech and Mount Wilson in 1925 by the Nobel Laureate Robert Millikan, and Zwicky repaid the favour by announcing on one occasion that Millikan had never had a good idea in his life. All of his colleagues were targets of his abuse and many of them were subjected to his favourite insult - 'spherical bastard.' Just as a sphere looks the same from every direction, a spherical bastard is someone who was a bastard whatever way you looked at them.' -Big Bang by Simon Singh, Chapter 4: Mavericks of the Cosmos, page 278 Come on! A book that throws in little asides like that while teaching you about history is more than worth the read. I definitely recommend this book to anyone even slightly curious about this topic.

Cadex batteryshop software download. I really enjoyed this book, especially after reading Singh's work on the history and proof of Fermat's Last Theorem. Singh is the perfect lay writer of science and science history. His prose flows quickly and he selects wonderful examples that explain more obscure topics. His books, and writers like him, should be assigned reading in high schools, and even middle schools, to expose kids to the wonders of science that often come across as boring and useless in typical science classes.

These types I really enjoyed this book, especially after reading Singh's work on the history and proof of Fermat's Last Theorem. Singh is the perfect lay writer of science and science history.

His prose flows quickly and he selects wonderful examples that explain more obscure topics. His books, and writers like him, should be assigned reading in high schools, and even middle schools, to expose kids to the wonders of science that often come across as boring and useless in typical science classes. These types of work would be a great boast to STEM, and even the arts (STEAM), showing the importance, beauty and value of writing, communicating, and philosophizing. I guess people would assume I'd give this five stars.

If I didn't know about the Big Bang and physics, I most likely would have. My rating is more a mark of how I felt about the book. It was too beginner, even though I'm certainly not a scientist. I've read a bunch and have taken several high school & college physics and astronomy classes. So, when Singh was talking about physics, the text seemed to move too slowly. Now, if I wasn't familiar with the topic, it would have been perfect.

But, to be honest, I did learn some interesting physics in the book, e.g. The actual cause of redshift is related to the stretching of spacetime rather than a doppler shift effect (p. 270), how to create carbon from helium within a star (pp. 390-396), and that lithium and boron were produced around the same time helium was being created out of hydrogen (p. As for the history of science, this is where Singh excels beyond most. I loved the history, the little tidbits, the emotions and the battles behind the theories, equations and discoveries. There were so many intriguing things from the ancient world to today.

I wish there had been more of these, but the book probably would have been twice as long! (The author mentions that in a Q&A appended to my edition, noting that his first draft had lots of neat items and it was about 1,000 pages long!). I'm also sad that the excitement of the public in response to these types of scientific discoveries seems to be fading, especially in the West and very especially in the US.

Most people just don't seem to think science or the larger world is as exciting as spectator violence or reality TV. I hope that writers like Singh can help put excitement and interest back in peoples' minds, and more importantly, their hearts. This is what captured me as a small boy and it has carried me to today. The wonder of a small child is something to try to grasp for each day. I'm a sucker for readable tomes explicating theoretical physics/ cosmology for the non-mathematically trained and feel compelled to pump up my puny understanding of the field every now and then. Singh kept me engaged almost all the way through The Big Bang(the book slacks off a bit toward the end)as he ran through the history of the science leading up to and encompassing the acceptance of The Big Bang theory as the most accurate description we now have of the origin and evolution of the universe I'm a sucker for readable tomes explicating theoretical physics/ cosmology for the non-mathematically trained and feel compelled to pump up my puny understanding of the field every now and then.

Singh kept me engaged almost all the way through The Big Bang(the book slacks off a bit toward the end)as he ran through the history of the science leading up to and encompassing the acceptance of The Big Bang theory as the most accurate description we now have of the origin and evolution of the universe. Most of the material here won't be new to anyone who has been paying attention or who has read such books as Brian Greene's Elegant Universe and/ or The Fabric of the Cosmos, but The Big Bang still provides a good review of the subject and an enjoyable read as well, with such anecdotes as the following to keep a reader amused: 'One tall tale explains how an astronomer driving to his observatory tried to use the Doppler effect to outwit the police. Having been caught jumping a red light, the astronomer argued that the light had appeared green to him because he was moving towards it and consequently it was blueshifted. The police officer excused him the ticket for running a red light, and instead doubled the fine and gave him a speeding ticket. To achieve such a dramatic wavelength shift, the astronomer would have had to be driving at roughly 200,000,000 km/h.' Simon Singh is a marvellously engaging non-fiction writer.

Only straying from his central subject to relay a surprising or eyebrow-raising anecdote, he manages to paint a human face on the history of our perception of the universe. In telling the story of the Big Bang theory, the book takes you through miniature biographies and descriptions of the impact of the life-work of Galileo, Copernicus, Kepler, Hubble and many others who strove and discovered gems of cosmological truth through history. Th Simon Singh is a marvellously engaging non-fiction writer. Only straying from his central subject to relay a surprising or eyebrow-raising anecdote, he manages to paint a human face on the history of our perception of the universe.

In telling the story of the Big Bang theory, the book takes you through miniature biographies and descriptions of the impact of the life-work of Galileo, Copernicus, Kepler, Hubble and many others who strove and discovered gems of cosmological truth through history. The anecdotes include tales of serendipitious discoveries, warring theorists, revolutionary ideas, and the barriers to understanding that plagued scientists through the ages - establishment, dogma, pesky pigeons.it's all here. The science is explained narratively, with a rare equation thrown in after the pictures and allegories have already gotten you to a point of clear understanding. All in all, Big Bang is an enjoyable run-through of the assembly of a long history of observable facts into a coherent theory of the universe, a triumph over the very human failings of ego and fanciful, groundless assertion. Another epic by Simon Singh, a talented writer, and a great story-teller. The book can be undoubtedly considered as a small encyclopedia of Cosmology. The amount of information summarized over the course of hundred years in this compact book is fascinating.

Likewise his previous works, the author takes a detour between subjects to explain other topics and then links it to the main story in an extraordinary way possible. No extra knowledge, besides some basic physical understanding, is required a Another epic by Simon Singh, a talented writer, and a great story-teller. The book can be undoubtedly considered as a small encyclopedia of Cosmology.

The amount of information summarized over the course of hundred years in this compact book is fascinating. Likewise his previous works, the author takes a detour between subjects to explain other topics and then links it to the main story in an extraordinary way possible. No extra knowledge, besides some basic physical understanding, is required as a prerequisite to the scientific subjects. It inspired me to look again and understand the universe more deeply than ever before. The five chapters plus an epilogue section of the book would surely be in my ever-reading list. Also, there is a great further reading list in the end of the book which is quite helpful for those who want to explore more.

I've been a fan of Simon Singh since I read 'Fermat's Enigma', and this book was another great one. It's not just about the Big Bang theory, but about the whole history of cosmology, starting with the-earth-is-flat-and-at-the-center-of-the-universe beliefs, up until the present-day understanding of things. He pulls in lots and lots of interesting characters, both well-known (Galileo and Einstein) and less well-known, all of whom are worthy of attention. Singh has a real gift for turning science I've been a fan of Simon Singh since I read 'Fermat's Enigma', and this book was another great one. It's not just about the Big Bang theory, but about the whole history of cosmology, starting with the-earth-is-flat-and-at-the-center-of-the-universe beliefs, up until the present-day understanding of things.

He pulls in lots and lots of interesting characters, both well-known (Galileo and Einstein) and less well-known, all of whom are worthy of attention. Singh has a real gift for turning science into a story, and explaining it in a way that non-scientists can understand.

I'm surprised that I hadn't heard of Simon Singh earlier. He is a fantastic storyteller who makes science easy without dumbing it down. In this book he takes you through a fascinating journey from fables about how God created the universe, all the way to the Big Bang and the questions that still remain to be answered.

He explains how each discovery led to questions which led to more discoveries. He also provides a peek into contemporary societal beliefs at each stage of this journey to show how I'm surprised that I hadn't heard of Simon Singh earlier. He is a fantastic storyteller who makes science easy without dumbing it down. In this book he takes you through a fascinating journey from fables about how God created the universe, all the way to the Big Bang and the questions that still remain to be answered.

He explains how each discovery led to questions which led to more discoveries. He also provides a peek into contemporary societal beliefs at each stage of this journey to show how heroic the scientists needed to be to defend their theories. I'm now off to read more of his books. “If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe.” Carl Sagan It may seem like a silly thing to say, but I like to know where I am. Living in Solon, Ohio, I know that Lake Erie is a few miles to the north (go to the end of our street and turn left).

Downtown Cleveland is about 20 miles to the northwest, Chagrin Falls just east, Chicago about a 6 hour drive west, DC about 6 hours through Pennsylvania to the east. When I travel, I always look at a map, even if I’m n “If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe.” Carl Sagan It may seem like a silly thing to say, but I like to know where I am. Living in Solon, Ohio, I know that Lake Erie is a few miles to the north (go to the end of our street and turn left). Downtown Cleveland is about 20 miles to the northwest, Chagrin Falls just east, Chicago about a 6 hour drive west, DC about 6 hours through Pennsylvania to the east. When I travel, I always look at a map, even if I’m not driving; where is the hotel in relation to the airport, where is San Diego compared to LA and Tijuana, where is the French Quarter in relation to English Turn, to Tulane University, to Lake Ponchartrain?

I understand that many people don’t bother themselves with where they are, they’re here. (Many) women understand how to get somewhere by directions, left at the Burger King, right at the house with the big porch. Where they are is not important: which direction would you go to get to Chicago gets a blank look, left at Burger King? Lately men are just as bad.

I asked a recent a 50-something male visitor to my home, which way did you come, Harper Road or Rt. I got a blank look; I just turned where the GPS told me. I like to know how things work. I understand how an internal combustion engine works, why a refrigerator is cold inside and hot underneath, what statistics mean and what they don’t mean.

I like to think I understand the basics of current scientific thought; the significance of DNA to genetic development of organisms and species, the periodic table, the movement of the planets, the Big Bang Theory. This book is for people who like to know where they are – cosmologically speaking.

I thought I had a thorough lay (non-mathematical – Colin don’t laugh) understanding of the general theory of relativity. I read Hawking’s A Brief History of Time more than 20 years ago and many other popularizations since. But I always wondered, if the speed of light was a constant, how does gravitational attraction affect stars and planets instantly no matter how distant. Now I understand.

Simon Singh has written a wonderfully readable, informative book about the development of mankind’s understanding about the universe. The science is comprehensible and clearly explained, the biographical sketches of people who made key contributions, particularly during the past 150 years are entertaining and in some cases inspiring.

An excellent read in itself, the book is made even better by the quotations that Singh puts at the beginning of each chapter and sprinkles throughout the text. “I do not feel obliged to believe that the same God who has endowed us with sense, reason and intellect has intended us to forgo their use.” Galileo Galilei. “ Living on Earth may be expensive, but it includes an annual free trip around the Sun.” Anonymous. “Physics is not a religion. Really 2.5 stars 'Good scientists, however, should not be swayed by common sense, because it sometimes has little to do with the underlying scientific truth.' That seems to be something of a running theme, through this book, at least the 325 or so pages I managed to finish before giving up. That's right, I did not finish this book although I really did try.

I don't think you need to have a Ph.D in Astrophysics or Mathematics to understand this book, but a solid understanding of Algebra and Geometr Really 2.5 stars 'Good scientists, however, should not be swayed by common sense, because it sometimes has little to do with the underlying scientific truth.' That seems to be something of a running theme, through this book, at least the 325 or so pages I managed to finish before giving up. That's right, I did not finish this book although I really did try. I don't think you need to have a Ph.D in Astrophysics or Mathematics to understand this book, but a solid understanding of Algebra and Geometry does seem necessary.

It may be that it's just impossible to talk in any depth about the science of the universe without getting all mathematical or scientific but it takes only TWELVE PAGES (less really, because the chapter does not begin on page 1) before we get our first geometry-based image, explaining how Eratosthenes used shadow angles to estimate the circumference of the earth. The average person just flipping through the book to see if it would interest them is likely to feel put-off because a lot of the images and figures used look complicated and like something only a Ph.D would understand.

What makes it worse (although, presumably the author was trying to actually make it better) is that many of the figures and diagrams are not drawn to scale, often because if they were they wouldn't fit on the page, but that means that a) those who actually do have a mathematical mind but through facts and numbers, not theories, might be confused because the numbers aren't there and the diagram would look wrong, not being drawn to scale and b) those who, like myself, STILL don't understand even with the simplified diagrams might end up feeling incredibly stupid. Or maybe the author agreed with the quote he includes from Galileo during the section on Albert Einstein: 'The book of nature is written in the language of mathematics, and its characters are triangles, circles and other geometrical figures, without which it is humanly impossible to understand a single word of it; without these one is wandering about in a dark labyrinth'.

So after awhile, I gave up on trying to actually understand the Big Bang and just read the book as a history of the scientist who lead to our current understanding of the Big Bang. But even that was hard because Singh still describes just what it was the scientist were experimenting with or trying to prove or disprove but that STILL goes over my head. So eventually, I gave up. Simon Lehna Singh, MBE (born 1 January 1964) is a British author who has specialised in writing about mathematical and scientific topics in an accessible manner. He is the maiden winner of the Lilavati Award.

His written works include Fermat's Last Theorem (in the United States titled Fermat's Enigma: The Epic Quest to Solve the World's Greatest Mathematical Problem), The Code Book (about cryptogra Simon Lehna Singh, MBE (born 1 January 1964) is a British author who has specialised in writing about mathematical and scientific topics in an accessible manner. He is the maiden winner of the Lilavati Award. His written works include Fermat's Last Theorem (in the United States titled Fermat's Enigma: The Epic Quest to Solve the World's Greatest Mathematical Problem), The Code Book (about cryptography and its history), Big Bang (about the Big Bang theory and the origins of the universe) and Trick or Treatment? Alternative Medicine on Trial (about complementary and alternative medicine).

He has also produced documentaries and works for television to accompany his books, is a trustee of NESTA, the National Museum of Science and Industry and co-founded the Undergraduate Ambassadors Scheme.